You are a road trip enthusiast, and you have decided to upgrade your travel experience by buying an RV trailer. Unfortunately, you know little about buying or even owning one because all along you have been renting one. Before you commit to buying one, here are some few questions you should ask yourself.

 

Dealer
1. Who is the actual owner?

Always insist on meeting the owner. Most RV trailers are sold by RV dealers; while they can offer you a good deal, it is not like dealing with the owner – click here to get an understanding of the difference. The dealer will be interested in making a profit out of the sale; the owner, on the other hand, can give you a better deal and give you a history of the trailer.

 

record
2. How about the maintenance records 

These are the Holy Grail of buying the trailer. From the records, you can tell if the RV has any underlying problems that the dealer has not disclosed yet. Since RV owners are enthusiasts, they have meticulously documented records. You can tell if the previous owner is careful enough to replace, fix and even service it when needed to. If the records are up to date, accurate, and well-kept then you can have the confidence that the trailer is well maintained.

 

test drive
3. Is a test drive on the table?

If the owner or the dealer does not allow you to take it for a test drive, then do not even bother. That should be a major red flag; there is something they do not want you to discover. If they allow you to, learn how it handles certain speeds, breaking system, swerving. Does it feel too big for you? Can you adjust to it? Does it get too hot, or does it whine a lot in protest over hills? If the answers to these specific questions are satisfactory to you, you can proceed to the buying phase.

 

inspection
4. Can you get it inspected?

An RV for sale might not have gone for inspection for some time. Having the rig inspected can save you a lot of time and agony. It can cost you a little under $200, but it is worth every penny. If the RV passes a third party inspection, then it is a good sign that you should move to the negotiating phase. If on the other hand the owner or dealer denies your request to inspect it, I would advise that you look for another trailer to buy.

Conclusion 

Buying a used RV is harder than you might have imagined. It involves several quality checks which are worth your time for your peace of mind. You do not want to buy an RV trailer only to have it stall on you after a month. Since most RV sales are made by dealers so be weary of their sweet language. Use these four questions and visit Lovesick Lake RV Sales; you will have an easy time buying.

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